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class a pre 1940Jaguar grew from humble beginnings with the partnership of William Lyons and William Walmsley building sidecars for motorcycles in Blackpool, England. They formed the Swallow Sidecar Company in 1922 which later evolved into a coach building company making Swallow cars from 1927 to 1932 using other companies’ chassis and becoming SS Cars Ltd in 1933.

The first cars with SS chassis were the SS1 and the SS2. Both had side-valve engines and running gear supplied by the Standard Motor Company, the SSI as a six-cylinder and the SS2 as a four. Over the next four years the factory produced more than 6000 cars all built with timber frames in a variety of body styles including two-door tourers, coupes, saloons, drophead coupes. Each year improvements were made to the chassis, running gear, brakes, interiors and cosmetic detail.

For the 1936 model the company revamped its body styles and produced its own overhead valve 1.5 and 2.5 litre engines. To mark the beginning of this new overhead valve era all subsequent SS cars had the model designation “Jaguar” added.

For 1938 SS Cars changed the old coach building methods to the use of bought in pressed metal body frames and panels. Also the 3.5-litre overhead valve engine was introduced so the model range for that year was four-door saloons in 1.5-litre, 2.5-litre and 3.5-litre forms and two-door drophead coupes in the same engine sizes. More than 5000 cars were made in 1939. No new models were introduced for 1939 and 1940 and the factory turned to manufacturing equipment to support the war effort.

class b ss90 ss100 1935 1940The SS90 was built on a shortened 2.5 litre side valve SS1 chassis with a top speed of 90mph but only 23 of these were built in 1935. The SS100 in 1936 had the 2.5 litre overhead valve engine and a top speed of 94 mph (190 were made) and the 3.5 litre engine was added in 1938 (118 were made) to give a top speed of 98mph.

class c mark iv mark vIn 1945 car production recommenced accompanied by a new company name, Jaguar Cars Ltd. Lyons’ highest priority was to increase production quickly, so car manufacture recommenced where it had left off in 1940, building cars that were no different to the pre-war models apart from some necessary re-badging and cars being available in left hand drive. The SS100 and the 1.5-litre drophead coupe were deleted from the range. These post-war models were not given a distinct model name, however a label of Mark V was assigned to new models released in 1948, so an immediate post-war model is now, retrospectively, labelled a Mark IV.  

For the Mark V, the six-cylinder engines and gearboxes were about the only items retained from the previous model, the Mark IV. Major mechanical changes included torsion bar independent front suspension, hydraulic brakes, disc wheels to replace the spoked wheels and a totally redesigned chassis with cruciform bracing and chassis rails sweeping over the rear axle. The Mark V range consisted of saloons and drophead coupes in the two six-cylinder engine sizes.

class d mark vii mark viim mark viii and mark ixExport was seen as a major factor in rebuilding British industry with the government offering significant benefits to companies that were willing to go in this direction. Jaguar eagerly grasped the off er and launched a new big car with a new powerful engine at the 1950 London Motor Show, the Mark VII.

It was considered ideal for the US market. The expression Grace, Space and Pace was coined with this vehicle in mind and it certainly had all three. A beautifully-designed luxury six-seater that could exceed 100 mph straight from the showroom floor, it put Jaguar firmly into the forefront of the luxury car market. It was built on a modified Mark V chassis.

The new 3.4 litre XK twin cam engine was capable of driving this two-ton saloon smoothly in city traffic but was equally able to match the performance of much smaller, sportier cars. The XK engine was specifically designed with this vehicle in mind. The strength and reliability of this engine was to be used in progressively improved and enlarged forms from 1948 in the XK 120 right up to 1986 in the XJ6 Series 3. The XK engine was simply a magnificent piece of engineering. It achieved many racing successes.  

In 1954 an updated Mark VIIM was released with subtle exterior changes and some mechanical refinements which made a lovely car just a bit nicer.

When the Mark VIII went on the market in 1956 not a lot was changed but the one piece windscreen, an altered grille and other enhancements distinguished this model from its predecessors.

Further modifications were added with the release of the Mark IX in 1958, in production to 1961. A 3.8 litre engine was fitted, power steering added and four wheel disc brakes were standard. Again outwardly no change except for a small badge on the boot lid but power was up from 180 to 220 bhp. These Jaguars were in production more than 11 years. Long production runs enabled Jaguar to keep prices down and to keep quality high thus gaining very valuable export dollars from the USA.

class e xk 120 xk 140 and xk 150The London Motor Show of 1948 saw the introduction of the XK 120, one of the most important sports cars ever developed. It featured spectacular styling and the brand-new twin cam XK 3.4 litre engine. This was truly a show-stopper. With a top speed of more than 120 mph in standard form, this really was a quantum leap forward.

The aluminium bodied XK 120 was initially intended to be built in small numbers as a test bed/showcase for the new XK engine, a twin overhead camshaŌ engine with either four or six cylinders. There was to be a four cylinder XK100 and a six cylinder XK 120. However due to overwhelming approval and interest in the XK 120 and production difficulties, the XK 100 was stillborn and all efforts were channelled into the XK 120. The original intent had been to use the XK 120 to promote the XK engine in order to interest buyers in the new XK engined Mark VII sedan but it was immediately evident that the planned production of 200 units (240 were made) needed to be totally revamped.

The original aluminium coach-built body and laminated ash frame had to be replaced with modern pressed steel body panels in order to shorten build time to keep pace with the fl ood of orders for the XK120. Production started in 1950. One XK120 came 12th at Le Mans in that year.

The XK 120 in fixed head coupe form was unveiled at the 1951 Geneva Motor Show. It is arguably the most beautiful and graceful of all cars designed by Sir William Lyons. In 1952 one of these averaged 100mph for a week at the Montlhéry circuit near Paris.

In 1953 the XK 120 SE (Special Equipment) was available with a package of performance enhancing updates. Also in that year the XK 120 Drop Head Coupe was available as an upmarket version.

In 1954 the XK 140 open two-seater was released with the SE engine as standard and subtle changes that improved the car but retained its classic looks. The engine was moved forward three inches, rack and pinion steering added and several mechanical alterations improved performance. An automatic transmission could be specified from early 1955. It was also available in Fixed Head Coupe and Drop Head Coupe forms.

The year 1957 saw the birth of the XK 150. Driven by market demands the new model was more a grand tourer that an out and out sports car. In 1958 the XK 150S model had a power increase and in its final version the XK 150S was very quick (136 mph) with the 3.8 litre engine. For all XK 150s braking was significantly improved by servo-assisted disc brakes. The higher hip line of the front guards and bulkier overall appearance were an acknowledgement that aerodynamically a totally new shape was needed. By 1960 the XK range had reached its use by date.

class f xk120c (c -type) d-type and xkssThe XK120 race results indicated to engineer Walter Hassen that if Jaguar was to be successful it was essential to have a specially designed competition car. In October 1950 Lyons gave the green light to design and develop, in less than nine months, a completely new car to race at Le Mans the following June, the XK120C (C for competition).

The quality of the design and the engineering team Lyons gathered is probably best demonstrated with the development of the C-Type. With the exception of the wonderfully reliable 3.4 litre XK engine (developed to give 210bhp) an entirely new car was designed. A tubular space-frame was developed. Malcolm Sayer, Jaguar’s aerodynamicist, provided the stroke of genius with his beautiful and sleek aluminium bodied masterpiece. Weight was reduced to 940kg, 400kg lighter than the XK120. Rack and pinion steering and a mass of other mechanical improvements were designed, built and developed.

Not only did they meet the deadline, three C-Types were completed in time for the race, but the history books show that the C-Type, driven by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead, won with a record average speed of 93mph! A total of 53 C-Types were produced for sale in 1952 and 49 still existed in 2001, all very valuable. For 1953 a lighter C-Type (880kg) with 220bhp (using 3 twin-choke Weber carburettors) and disc brakes was developed and came 1st (average speed 106mph), 2nd and 4th at Le Mans.

In 1954 a new competition car, the D-Type, was unveiled. The magnesium alloy monocoque construction gave excellent structural strength. A substantial front sub frame was attached to carry the engine and suspension, and the rear axle and suspension were attached to the rear mono bulkhead. Major changes to the engine were a dry-sump lubrication system and being canted over at 8 degrees allowed a lower frontal height. Power output was up to 250bhp, weight was 880kg.

A D-Type came 2nd at Le Mans in 1954 and was 1st in 1955 but the victory was marred by the tragic accident involving a MercedesBenz. For 1956 the 1955 factory cars were transferred to Ecurie Ecosse and the factory ran two D-Types with fuel injected 3.8 litre engines giving 285bh. But both failed to finish and an Ecurie Ecosse car won the race. In 1956 Ecurie Ecosse D-Types filled the first four places!

In 1957 Jaguar had unsold production D-Types (about 70 were made with 3.4 litre engines and 250bhp. All now are very valuable!) and started to convert them to road cars with a windscreen, hood and door. Just 16 were converted from D-Types when a disastrous fire at Browns Lane on 12 February 1957 consumed 300 finished or near finished cars including five D-Types scheduled for conversion together with all the relevant tooling. This put an end to the now fabled XKSS line. Try to buy one now! There are no factory production C-Types in Australia and only two production D-Types, both in NSW. Our Club Cs and Ds are replicas and worthy to represent the marque.

class g mk x 420g s-type and 420The 1961 Mark X is one of the biggest cars (1900kg) produced by Jaguar. At the time it was also the most sophisticated, bringing a host of new developments. The refinements included unitary body construction, fully independent suspension, disc brakes and a three-carburettor, 3.8 litre E-Type engine (265bhp) to drive this big cat, described by Road and Track as a true high performance sports sedan with a luxurious and spacious interior. The strong, rigid body shell housed let-down picnic tables for the back seat passengers and a full length mirror. Several limousines were built; one used by Sir William Lyons found its way to Australia. In those cars the front seats were 'fixed' due to a dividing privacy window between driver and passengers.

The 3.8 litre engine used originally was upgraded in 1964 to 4.2 litre (still with claimed 265bhp). Many other improvements were also included and genuine air conditioning was an option while the Varamatic power steering box and a much improved braking system were standard items.

In 1966 the Mark X was re-labelled 420G. Any changes were superficial or of a minor nature but extended its life until 1970. The last two years of production were a stop gap measure until build numbers of the new XJ6 reached necessary levels. In 1963 the S-Type was launched with either a 3.4 or a 3.8 litre engine used throughout the production run – 1963-1968.

Production numbers of the Mark X and S-Types were almost identical, just over 25,000 each. The S-Type was built as an intermediate size car between the Mark X and the Mark 2. The S-Type shared many of the same parts and components but the degrees of difference were many. The new independent rear suspension with in-board disc brakes necessitated a completely new frame work that closely resembled its larger cousin the Mark X. At the front the engine and front suspension were basically the same for the S-Type and Mark 2. Although the body shape was similar, no panels were interchangeable.

The 420 came on the market in October 1966 and production ceased in 1968 when the XJ6 was born. The 420 had a 4.2 litre engine and was derived from the S-Type as an upmarket luxury medium-sized car with sports car performance. The 420 was certainly better engineered than the S-Type with Mark X-like appearance and having fittings and equipment normally seen in much more expensive brands.

class h jaguar 2.4 (mark1) mark 2 240 and 340The 1955 to 1959 Jaguar 2.4, a compact sedan, was Jaguar’s first attempt at producing a unitary construction car. It was aimed at the lower end of the prestige car market and the entirely new designed and developed model proved to be suitable for enhancement and improvement over its production life. The 2.4 used a 2.4 litre 6 cylinder engine producing 112bhp. Coil springs were used at the front and some features from the D-Type were used in the rear suspension. It had drum brakes, although discs were optional from 1958. Top speed was 100mph. A 3.4 litre engine (210bhp) was available in 1957 giving a top speed of 120mph.

With the release of the Mark 2 in 1959 with 2.4, 3.4 and 3.8 litre engines the previous versions were retrospectively named the Mark 1. The exterior was improved with larger windows which provided a brighter interior. The rear track was widened and the front suspension modified. Disc brakes were standard front and rear.  

The weight was about 50kg more than the Mark 1. The 3.8 litre (220bhp) cars had limited slip differentials and power steering was available. This version was very successful on the race track with both factory and privately entered cars. It was a most competitive car in its day in the hands of such luminaries as Salvador, Moss, Hawthorn and our own Bob Jane. Production cars could reach 125mph.

In 1967 the Mark 2 was renamed as the 240 and 340. The 240 engine was up rated to133bhp, PCV replaced leather on the upholstery. Power steering was not available. Slim line bumpers similar to those on the S-Type were fitted. A small number of 380s were made to special order. Production ceased in 1968.

With the acquisition of Daimler in June 1960 the Daimler 2.5 litreV8 became available and was fitted in the Mark 2 body which was re badged and trimmed as the Daimler 250.

class i e typeFrom the day of its release in March 1961 at the Geneva Motor Show the E-Type was a sensation. Its UK price was less than 1,500 pounds, a claimed top speed of 150mph and it looked sensational. Its basis was straightforward and an evolution of the D-Type. The center and rear of the structure was made up of welded steel pressings with the rear sub frame underneath and a tubular frame attached at the front to hold the XK engine. Independent suspension all round as were the disc brakes, inboard at the rear, and rack and pinion steering. It was available as a two seater, fixed head Coupe and an open two seater Roadster. The initial engine was the well proven 3.8 litre developing a claimed 265bhp coupled to a strong gearbox and unique back axle. Weight was around 1200kg. This model ran from 1961 to 1964 and became known as the Series 1.

In 1964 the 4.2 litre engine (still with a claimed 265 bhp) was fitted with an all synchromesh gearbox. Modifications were ongoing and the cars became the Series 1.5. In 1966 a 2+2 version of the fixed head Coupe was available on a stretched body; weight was up to 1400kg. An auto gear box was available on this version.  

In 1968 to 1970 the Series 2 was available still with the 4.2 engine. Many changes were made to meet US regulations and to improve the usability of the car including better brakes. In 1971 for the Series 3 the 4.2 engine was replaced by the four carburettor, 5.3 litre V12 engine. Substantial changes were needed to accommodate this engine. Weight was 1500kg, power 276bhp and it claimed a top speed of 150mph. For the US market emission control requirements reduced the power significantly. Production ceased in 1973.

Given the XK 120 was a quantum leap in 1948 the E- Type in 1961 was equally important and world renowned. Today they are much appreciated with a reputation of being the best 20th century sports car.

class j xj series 1 series 2 and series 3 xjcIn 1968 the new Series 1 Jaguar XJ6 was launched with a choice of 2.8 (142bhp) or 4.2 litre (245bhp) XK engines, E-Type rear suspension and a top speed of 117/124mph. It was a keynote car, the most significant new Jaguar since the XK120 and the Mark VII. It was based on well established Jaguar practice and became a modern day classic with this series of Jaguars’ having a 24-year production life.

In 1972 a long wheel base version was launched with the new 5.3 litre V12 (269bhp) and this led many to proclaim this V12 Jaguar ‘the Best Car in the World’. The power (top speed 139 mph), smoothness, strength and safety were just some of its qualities. Road holding and driver/ passenger comfort set new standards of excellence. The long wheel option was soon extended to the XJ6 and called the XJ6L.

The revised XJ Series 2 of 1973 had many subtle mechanical, external and interior changes. In 1975 the 4.2 was joined by a 3.4 litre version. For some time Sir William Lyons and his team of designers and engineers had been contemplating the viability of a two-door coupe version. A Series 1 prototype somehow found its way to Australia and at least one Series 2 prototype is also here.

Finally in 1975 the car was released with either the 4.2 (XJ6C) or the 5.3 (XJ12C) V12 engine. After just two years production was halted. The XJC had become one of the rarest production Jaguars ever made and fast becoming a real collection piece with the 5.3 commanding a large premium.

To improve fuel consumption fuel injection was introduced on the V12 engine in 1975 and the 4.2 engine in 1979 in the Series 3. The XJ Series 3 was launched in 1979 with a slightly redesigned body (Pininfarina was consulted on the appearance) and with a choice of 3.4, 4.2 and 5.3 litre engines. The 3.4 engine remained on carburettors. The V12 engine was further developed and fitted with new cylinder heads designed by Michael May under Walter Hassan’s supervision to reduce fuel usage (reduced from 22.6L/100km to 18.2L/100km) and emissions. The revised V12 was known as HE for high efficiency. This version of the Series 3 continued in production along side the all new XJ6 (XJ40) until 1992.

class l xj-sFrom an original planning concept of the replacement for the E-Type, stricter laws for open cars in the USA and elsewhere made Jaguar opt for a prestige Grand Tourer with high speed and comfort rather than an out and out sports car. Using a modified short wheelbase XJ12 and the tried and true V12 5.3 litre engine (285bhp), the XJ-S was launched in 1975 as a fixed head coupe and remained unchanged until 1981. Top speed was a claimed 150mph. The body, designed by Malcolm Sayer, was controversial.

In 1981 the XJ-S HE was introduced. The V12 HE engine had new high-efficiency cylinder heads designed to improve the car’s less than special fuel economy. A few other relatively minor changes were made at the time.

In 1983 the all aluminium 225bhp, 3.6 litre 6 cylinder AJ6 engine (destined for the XJ40) was available in the XJ-S 3.6. Top speed was 141mph. This version was in production until 1991 but very few came to Australia. It used a lot less fuel than the V12. Also introduced that year was the XJ-S 3.6 cabriolet with a strengthened body. The Getrag manual gearbox was an option.  

The cabriolet was available with the V12 engine in 1985. In 1988 the XJ-S was available as a full convertible with either the 6 or 12 cylinder engine with further strengthening of the shell and with many body panels changed. Weight increased by 100kg over the cabriolet version.

The final version of the XJ-S in 1994 had the 4 litre AJ16 engine (223bhp) developed from the AJ6 for the X300 saloon. Maybe none came to Australia. It was available until 1996 as was the V12 version.

The Tom Walkinshaw Racing Team in 1982 was given the task, by Jaguar, of developing the XJ-S V12 for the European Touring Car Championship of 1982. Success in Europe, the USA and here at Bathurst certainly did no harm to Jaguar’s reputation. Mike Roddy has one of the Bathurst winning cars.

The XJ-S had what was one of the world’s smoothest V12 engines, a spectacular appearance, a rich interior and a very smooth and compliant ride. This extended to the 6 cylinder cars which were cheaper and more fuel efficient. The production run went from 1975 to 1996, the longest for any Jaguar model.

The last XK rolled off the assembly line in Jaguar’s Castle Bromwich plant on Friday, July 25, with the exciting and highly developed F-Type truly assuming the mantle of sports car with the inclusion of the F-type R. Powered by Jaguar’s incredible 5.0 V8 4040 kW with 680Nm of torque for sheer unadulterated performance that is 100 per cent exploitable – 0-100km/h in 4.2 seconds, best-in-class power and torque as well as best power-to-weight and torque-to-weight. F-Type R takes full advantage of the coupe’s extremely rigid body shell. The range continues with the XJ and XF models, the latter available in XFR-S configuration with many mechanical and body styling upgrades and sharing the F-Type-R engine achieving 0-100km/h in 4.6 secs.

The range consisted of the XJ AND XF models, the latter available in XFR-S configuration with many mechanical and styling upgrades and sharing the F-Type R engine achieving 0-100km/h in 4.6 secs. The current range consisted of the XJ with a choice of four petrol or diesel engines with eight speed transmissions, the XF saloon in five variants and similar engine trans combinations, the F-Type in four versions of V6 and V8 as coupe or convertible and the run out XK in coupe and convertible.

The reveal of the year was the new XE mid-sized saloon which added a heads-up display of key information direct to the windscreen ahead of the driver including speed, navigation, local speed limits etc. It was added to the range in 2015 which will also see the update for the XJ and the final run of the venerable and highly successful XF, the last of the steel bodied cars will finish production in 2015 making the Jaguar stable an all-aluminium projection and assembly line.

For limited release of only 250 cars is the F-Type based and D-Type Le Mans-inspired F-Type Project 7, also to go into production mid-2015. For more information browse www.jaguar.com.au/index

class m xj40 to current modelsThe Ford Motor Company took control of Jaguar in 1990 and Jaguar was restored with the rebirth of quality, reliability, genuine dynamic performance and drive response. Resulting from the worldwide financial crisis Ford sold Jaguar and Land Rover to Tata Motors of India. Tata wanted to expand sales and deliver beautifully designed cars of the highest engineering standards and this they have achieved.

The XJ40 was unveiled in October 1986 with a new body, styling and power trains. When Ford took control they injected substantial funds which rebuilt the production lines and the development and building of the X300, an evolution of the XJ40. It was launched in 1994. Engines were 3.2 or 4.0 litre sixes or a 6 litre V12. The 4.0 litre had a supercharged option, top speed 250 kph.

By 1997 the six cylinder X300 engines and the venerable V12 were pensioned off . Their replacement, the 290bhp AJ-V8 engine, was used in the XK8 sports car and in the revised XJ named the XJ8 or XJR (X308). The exterior was very similar to the X300 but the excellent new engine and totally revamped interior boosted sales. A supercharged version developed 370bhp adding to the sales success. These ran until the all new aluminium X350 XJ was released in 2003.

The X350 was built almost entirely of aluminium and was 200kg lighter than the preceding model. A V6 option made a comeback and the V8 was continued. The new lighter, stiff er structure provided improved all round performance. The list of improvements was vast, interior space was increased in all directions, boot space increased by 30 per cent over the X300/X308.

The next major development was the unveiling of the completely new XJ (X351) in July 2009. This had petrol and diesel engines in a range of con figurations. Supercharging was an option giving a top speed limited to 250 kph with transmission via a six speed automatic gearbox. The list of luxury standard items was remarkable, a panoramic glass roof, air suspension, a top sound system. The diesel gave seven litres /100 km.

The new S-Type introduced in 1998 was a mid-sized luxury executive car. Its build period ran to 2008. Engine sizes, petrol and diesel, ranged from 2.5 litre AJ-V6 to a 4.2 litre AJ-V8, transmissions came in 5 speed manual or a 6 speed automatic depending on the model. The 4.2 litre V8 supercharged 400bhp S-Type R added in 2002 was an absolute rocket, 0 to 100 kph in 5.6 seconds. A 4.2 non supercharged model (300bhp) was introduced in 2004 as was the 2.7 litre V6 diesel.

Refinements and improvements continued during its six year production run. In 2005 new front and rear aprons, a slightly modified grill etc., kept the S-Type range fresh.

 

In 2008 Jaguar replaced the S-Type with the XF. An amazing transformation in design and style. It featured advanced aerodynamics, length was increased and the roof line heightened to provide better headroom. Engines were carried over from the S-Type. In January 2008 the XF was awarded ‘What Car?’ magazine car of the year and it won the 2009 best executive award. The XF also won ‘What Diesel?’ magazine’s car of the year in 2008.

The X-Type (X400), the compact executive car of the range, arrived in 2001. It retained the retro look of the earlier XJ series cars. It was based on the Ford Mondeo platform, initially with all wheel drive with 2.5 litre and 3.0 litre V6 petrol engines. In 2003 a front wheel drive-only version with a 2.1 litre V6 became available. This was 70kg lighter than the four-wheel drive cars. An estate bodied version came on the market in 2004 but was not sold in Australia. In 2003 a 2.0 litre diesel engine was added. The X-Type continued to be improved with face lifts and minor engine variants, the frontal alterations of 2008 resembled the XF look. Production ceased in 2009.

After 21 honourable years the XJS was given its last farewell in 1996. The all new XK8 came onto the scene that year. It was available as a coupe or convertible and was the first 8 cylinder car produced by Jaguar using the AJ-V8 motor.  

This beautiful vehicle had a naturally aspirated engine or a supercharged variant known as the XKR. They came with self levelling xenon head lamps, a navigation system, cruise control, air bags and a myriad of other modern features. Speed was limited to 250 kph. The year 2005 saw the XK (X150) with a new aluminium body, performance enhancements and a totally new cabin. The convertible had a conventional cloth top that opened or closed in under 20 seconds.

2010 Models

class m xj40 to current models 2The 2010 XJ range had 3.0 litre V6 diesel engines, up from 2.7 litre, 5.0 litre direct injection V8 petrol and 5.0 litre V8 petrol supercharged rated at 346kW or 375kW. All had 6 speed automatic transmissions and were limited to 250kph. The safety and security systems were state of the art and the optional features were extensive. The interior timber veneers and the leather shades were exquisite. Head linings and carpet selections complement the overall ambiance of a stunning new beginning for Jaguar. The cabin instrumentation and driver controls were all excellently positioned.  

The new XJ made a quantum leap into the future with its engine management systems, the inbuilt safety systems, the HD touch screen, blind spot monitor, rear camera parking, etc. The XF and XFR for 2010 were further developed with a new, advanced 3.0 litre AJ V6D, GEN 111 S diesel and two new 5.0 litre AJ V8, GEN 111 petrol engines to take XF performance to new heights. The sporting appearance and the use of the most up to date engineering placed these beautifully constructed cars in the absolute forefront of luxury cars. The performances of the latest XK and XKR sports cars can be compared favourably with any of their rivals. The naturally aspirated V8 and the supercharged 306 kW 4.2 litre V8 of the XKR balance effortless performance with superb refinement.  

2011 Models

class m xj40 to current models 3Jaguar unveiled the new XKRR Special Edition to mark the 50th Anniversary of the E- Type that was limited to just 25 cars. This car was clearly aimed at the serious sports car/race car enthusiast with very deep pockets. Design Director Ian Callum said “The styling of this car isn’t about image, it’s about true performance. Like other iconic Jaguars before it, the styling has been driven by geometry and aerodynamics for genuine design purity. The physics required to achieve 300km/h have lead to the aesthetic; if you don’t like the way it looks, you probably won’t like the way it drives either”.

This car weighed 1735kgs, the lightest in its class. The XKR-S was equipped with Jaguar’s “Adaptive Dynamics” which provided a continuously variable damping system that monitored and controlled all inputs that might aff ect the ride and handling of the car.

The 2011 XF improvements across the range included a new 2.2 litre diesel power plant that had an 8 speed ZF transmission with “silky smooth” shifts and was extremely quick. This new variant joined the 3.0 litre diesel and the other engine choices. All aspects of driver comfort and the latest electronic functions were included as with all that year’s Jaguars.

The XJ range featured normal and long wheelbase models and a broad selection of petrol and diesel engines, all using a 6 speed auto transmission. The variety of body colours and interior trims were comprehensive. The set-out and design of the driving compartment was great with all gauges and instruments ideally positioned with everything well within reach. The latest GPS/ touch screen/in car entertainment, Bluetooth, telephone etc. were all part of the package. The exterior and interior design work was very beautiful.  

2012 Models

The XJ, XF and XK models all received revisions for 2012. The XKR-S was announced and was the fasted sports car ever built by Jaguar with a top speed of 300kph and 0 to 60mph in 4.2 seconds. It had an up rated supercharged 5.00 litre AJ-V8 GEN111 R direct injection petrol engine with variable valve timing on all 4 camshafts. 550PS (542bhp) and 680 Nm of torque! All mechanical and aerodynamic features were revised to be consistent with the very high performance. It has achieved sub eight- minutes lap times at the Nurburgring!

The XJ had a new V6 3.0 litre petrol engine option. All engines came with a 6 speed transmission. New exterior and interior colours and more options were available. The XF was available with a new 2.2 litre 4 cylinder turbo diesel engine with stop/ start system, the first time in a Jaguar 52 mpg was achievable. Revisions were made to the front and rear to bring it in line with XJ styling.

2014 Models 

The last XK rolled off the assembly line in Jaguar’s Castle Bromwich plant on Friday, July 25, with the exciting and highly developed F-Type truly assuming he mantle of sports car with the inclusion of the F-type R. Powered by Jaguar’s incredible 5.0 V8 4040 kW with 680Nm of torque for sheer unadulterated performance that is 100 per cent exploitable – 0-100km/h in 4.2 seconds, best-in-class power and torque as well as best power-to-weight and torque-to-weight. F-Type R takes full advantage of the coupe’s extremely rigid body shell. The range continues with the XJ and XF models, the latter available in XFR-S configuration with many mechanical and body styling upgrades and sharing the F-Type-R engine achieving 0-100km/h in 4.6 secs.

The range consisted of the XJ AND XF models, the latter available in XFR-S configuration with many mechanical and styling upgrades and sharing the F-Type R engine achieving 0-100km/h in 4.6 secs. The current range consisted of the XJ with a choice of four petrol or diesel engines with eight speed transmissions, the XF saloon in five variants and similar engine trans combinations, the F-Type in four versions of V6 and V8 as coupe or convertible and the run out XK in coupe and convertible.

The reveal of the year was the new XE mid-sized saloon which added a heads-up display of key information direct to the windscreen ahead of the driver including speed, navigation, local speed limits etc. It was added to the range in 2015 which will also see the update for the XJ and the final run of the venerable and highly successful XF, the last of the steel bodied cars will finish production in 2015 making the Jaguar stable an all-aluminium projection and assembly line.

For limited release of only 250 cars is the F-Type based and D-Type Le Mans-inspired F-Type Project 7, also to go into production mid-2015. For more information browse www.jaguar.com.au/index

 

2016 Models

2016-jaguar-xf-lr

Jaguar XF

The new updated XF, first launched in 2007, has evolved into a class leader with design, performance and better aerodynamics, with a new engine range, has improved its already excellent fuel efficiency.

This new model has two petrol and two diesel engines, combined with a super-smooth eight speed auto transmission. Some of the vast array of electronic driver assistance are:

  • Throttle mapping for ultra-smooth acceleration over the entire rev. range,
  • Adaptive Damping Control (via the Touch screen)
  • In Control Pro Infotainment System (again via the Touch screen)

The safety features in the XF include emergency braking, lane departure warning system, adaptive cruise/tracking and safe distance warning. The braking system is remarkable! With no hesitation of fade.

Jaguar XE

Jaguar’s new entrant is the brand new compact sporting saloon XE. Top performance with punch provided by either petrol or diesel engines with turbo or supercharged "assistance" with an eight speed ZF auto transmission. The four "models" in the range come with an endless variety of refinements, even in the so called basic model,

The usual comparison with other German/European vehicles will be made but Jaguar XE, has not caught up, it has jumped to the front of the pack.  The suspension, front and rear, permits vertical movement as well as fore-aft "adjustment" in a superb controlled way. With its lightweight construction (75% aluminium) it is a superb road holding, sports car, with luxury cabin and controls.

Jaguar F-Pace

When Jaguar first contemplated adding an SUV to their model range, care had to be exercised as Land Rover like Jaguar is owned by Tata. A five seat configuration rather than, seven of several opposition SUVs was the direction chosen to fit the chosen position in the market.

This "all" aluminum, Ian Callum-designed, vehicle has redefined and exceeded the Company sales expectations. The F-Pace looks like a Jaguar, drives like a Jaguar and most importantly handles like a Jaguar.