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Mark VII, Mark VIIM, Mark VIII and Mark IX

class d mark vii mark viim mark viii and mark ixExport was seen as a major factor in rebuilding British industry with the government offering significant benefits to companies that were willing to go in this direction. Jaguar eagerly grasped the off er and launched a new big car with a new powerful engine at the 1950 London Motor Show, the Mark VII.

It was considered ideal for the US market. The expression Grace, Space and Pace was coined with this vehicle in mind and it certainly had all three. A beautifully-designed luxury six-seater that could exceed 100 mph straight from the showroom floor, it put Jaguar firmly into the forefront of the luxury car market. It was built on a modified Mark V chassis.

The new 3.4 litre XK twin cam engine was capable of driving this two-ton saloon smoothly in city traffic but was equally able to match the performance of much smaller, sportier cars. The XK engine was specifically designed with this vehicle in mind. The strength and reliability of this engine was to be used in progressively improved and enlarged forms from 1948 in the XK 120 right up to 1986 in the XJ6 Series 3. The XK engine was simply a magnificent piece of engineering. It achieved many racing successes.  

In 1954 an updated Mark VIIM was released with subtle exterior changes and some mechanical refinements which made a lovely car just a bit nicer.

When the Mark VIII went on the market in 1956 not a lot was changed but the one piece windscreen, an altered grille and other enhancements distinguished this model from its predecessors.

Further modifications were added with the release of the Mark IX in 1958, in production to 1961. A 3.8 litre engine was fitted, power steering added and four wheel disc brakes were standard. Again outwardly no change except for a small badge on the boot lid but power was up from 180 to 220 bhp. These Jaguars were in production more than 11 years. Long production runs enabled Jaguar to keep prices down and to keep quality high thus gaining very valuable export dollars from the USA.